Inventory and cost of goods sold relationship quiz

Estimating Ending Inventory & Cost of Goods Sold | avb4you.info

inventory and cost of goods sold relationship quiz

Accounting for merchandising operations quiz 1. In a perpetual inventory system the cost of goods sold is determined and recorded each time a sale occurs. . The equation represents the relationship between the assets, liabilities , and. If you have difficulty answering the following questions, learn more about this topic by reading our Inventory and Cost of Goods Sold (Explanation). 1. Why and how do you adjust the inventory account in the periodic method? What is gross What is the difference between inventory and the cost of goods sold?.

The COGS definition state that only inventory sold in the current period should be included. Both have drastically different implications on the calculation.

The first unit purchased is also the first unit sold. Going back to our example, Shane purchases merchandise in January and then again in June.

Estimating Ending Inventory & Cost of Goods Sold

The last unit purchased is the first unit sold. Thus, Shane would sell his June inventory before his January inventory.

inventory and cost of goods sold relationship quiz

It also makes a difference what type of inventory system is used to count the purchases and sales. Most companies use one of two methods: If Shane used this, he would periodically count his inventory during the year, maybe at the end of each quarter. If Shane only takes an inventory count every three months he might not see problems with the inventory or catch shrinkage as it happens over time. As soon as something is purchased, it is recorded in the system.

inventory and cost of goods sold relationship quiz

As soon as something is sold, it is removed from the system keeping a real time count of inventory. Of course, you can equate liabilities to negative assets.

Capital is divided into fixed capital which represents the excess between the fixed assets and the fixed liabilities and working capital which is the excess of current assets over current liabilities. Having cleared up the terminology, we can start to explain the purpose of the accounting equation.

inventory and cost of goods sold relationship quiz

The accounting equation is how double-entry bookkeeping is established. The equation represents the relationship between the assets, liabilities, and owner's equity of a small business.

It is necessary to understand the accounting equation to learn how to read a balance sheet. The accounting equation shows what the firm owns its assets are purchased by either what it owes its liabilities or by what its owners invest its shareholder equity or capital.

Accounting Test 2

This relationship is expressed in the form of an equation. This equation must balance because everything the entity owns assets has to be purchased with something, either a liability or owner's capital.

inventory and cost of goods sold relationship quiz

Assets refer to items like inventory or accounts receivable. Examples of liabilities are bank loans or accounts payable. Owner's capital or equity is the investment or capital the owner has in the firm. The accounting equation can be shown in two other ways: If you look at a balance sheet, you will see that the balance sheet is basically an extended form of the accounting equation.

There is also an expanded accounting equation which shows the relationship between the income statement and the balance sheet. The expanded accounting equation, after you consider sales revenue and expenses, is: Until now, the accounting equation has focused on the 7 balance sheet components.

Now, splitting the owner's equity part of the accounting equation into revenues and expenses highlights the relationship between the balance sheet and the income statement because the key components of the firm's income statement are revenue and expenses. Revenues are what any given business earns from its product or service.

Chapter 10 Multiple-Choice Quiz

Expenses are what it costs the business to operate and provide the aforementioned product or service. The relationship between revenues and expenses is simple. If revenues are greater than expenses, the business makes a profit. If revenues are less than expenses, the business incurs a loss. The owner or owners of the entity may also withdraw a salary from the business. If the company is an SME small or medium enterprisesole proprietorship, partnership, or limited liability company, then the owner or owners will take a draw from the business as their salaries.

In addition to the scenario discussed above, there are other reason why a company may need to estimate the ending inventory and the cost of goods sold.

There may have been a loss of inventory due to theft or damage, in which the company is unable to place a value on the missing or damaged inventory.

Cost of Goods Sold (COGS) Formula | Calculation | Definition | Example

A business may also only perform physical inventory counts every quarter due to lack of personnel. In the periods that the company does not perform physical inventory counts, it would need to estimate the ending inventory and the cost of goods sold.

The Gross Profit Method Let's take a look at how to estimate the ending inventory and the cost of goods sold using the gross profit method.

inventory and cost of goods sold relationship quiz

In order to estimate ending inventory, we must first estimate the cost of goods sold.